National Film Registry Movies III

Images I've shared through my radio show "The Movie Music Spotlight": https://www.facebook.com/moviemusicspotlight
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It struck a chord - earning $476 million and making it the highest grossing live-action comedy until the release of "The Hangover Part II" in 2011. "Home Alone" was added to the Library of Congress' National Film Registry preservation list on December 13, 2023.
"Home Alone" movie soundtrack, 1990.
It struck a chord - earning $476 million and making it the highest grossing live-action comedy until the release of "The Hangover Part II" in 2011. "Home Alone" was added to the Library of Congress' National Film Registry preservation list on December 13, 2023.
a young boy holding two hair dryers and a cord attached to his back while standing in front of a white background
"Home Alone" promo still, 1990. Macaulay Culkin as Kevin McCallister.
a woman is talking on the phone while holding up a piece of paper in her hand
"Home Alone" movie still, 1990. Catherine O'Hara as Kate McCallister.
a young boy standing in front of a christmas tree holding a box with presents on it
"Home Alone" movie still, 1990. L to R: Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci.
PLOT: After his family leaves for a Christmas vacation in Paris, a ten year old kid (Culkin) must adapt to his lonely surroundings while defending his home against a pair of home invaders (Pesci, Daniel Stern).
black and white photograph of man with mustache hugging boy in front of stair railing, smiling at camera
Director Chris Columbus and Macaulay Culkin on the set of "Home Alone", 1990.
Writer/director John Hughes ("Sixteen Candles", "The Breakfast Club", "Ferris Bueller's Day Off") was preparing for a family vacation and thought about what he shouldn't leave behind. What if he forgot one of his kids? He wrote eight pages of notes while on vacation and upon arriving home wrote the screenplay for "Home Alone." Columbus had helped Hughes on the film "Christmas Vacation" and asked him to direct the movie. Chris did a re-write and added the character Old Man Marley.
a man in white shirt and black pants running with his hand on his hip as if to say, twelve years a slave
"12 Years a Slave" movie soundtrack, 2013.
Shot for $22 million, the movie earned $187 million and was proclaimed as a masterpiece in story telling. It would win four Oscars, including the Best Picture award, and was hailed as one of the decade's best films. It was added to the Library of Congress' National Film Registry preservation list in its first year of eligibility on December 13, 2023.
a woman sitting in the grass next to two baby birds
"12 Years a Slave" movie still, 2013. Lupita Nyong'o as Patsey.
In the mid-2000s, she worked on several films as part of the production crew. She enrolled at the Yale School of Drama in 2008 and upon graduation landed this role. She would win the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress and became a worldwide movie star overnight.
a group of people standing next to each other
"12 Years a Slave" movie still, 2013. L to R: Lupita Nyong'o, Michael Fassbinder, Chiwetel Ejiofor.
a man leaning on the side of a boat
"12 Years a Slave" movie still, 2013. Chiwetel Ejiofor as Solomon Northup.
PLOT: In the antebellum United States, a free black man (Ejiofor) from upstate New York, is abducted and sold into slavery.
two people standing in a cotton field looking at a laptop
On the set of "12 Years a Slave", 2013.
L to R: Director Steve McQueen, Lupita Nyong'o. Born in England and residing in Amsterdam, McQueen had found the 1853 memoir of Solomon Northup and his true story of being enslaved as a free man. He decided if a diary of Anne Frank could be transformed into a life changing story (then movie), the same should be done for this story. For many years, no one would back him until Brad Pitt decided to take the project on. This prompted others to join the production and the story was finally being made.
In 2008, "The Terminator" (1984) was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. This sequel was added to the same list on December 13, 2023. Don't hold your breath on the others.
"Terminator 2: Judgment Day" movie soundtrack, 1991.
In 2008, "The Terminator" (1984) was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. This sequel was added to the same list on December 13, 2023. Don't hold your breath on the others.
two men standing next to each other in front of a neon sign on the wall
"Terminator 2: Judgment Day" movie still, 1991. L to R: Robert Patrick, Arnold Schwarzenegger.
Photography, Fitness, Avengers, Round Sunglass Women, Golden Globe Award, Connor, Judgment, Worst Movies
"Terminator 2: Judgment Day" movie still, 1991. Linda Hamilton as Sarah Connor.
PLOT: A cyborg (Schwarzenegger), identical to the one who failed to kill Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton), must now protect her ten year old son John (Furlong) from an even more advanced and powerful cyborg (Robert Patrick). Fictional Characters, Bad News, Comebacks, Action Movies, Movies
"Terminator 2: Judgment Day" movie still, 1991. L to R: Edward Furlong, Arnold Schwarzenegger.
PLOT: A cyborg (Schwarzenegger), identical to the one who failed to kill Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton), must now protect her ten year old son John (Furlong) from an even more advanced and powerful cyborg (Robert Patrick).
two men riding on the back of a motorcycle next to each other in front of a body of water
On the set of "Terminator 2: Judgement Day", 1991.
L to R: Co-writer/producer/director James Cameron, Arnold Schwarzenegger.
two women standing next to each other in front of a newspaper
Thomas Newman - Desperately Seeking Susan / Making Mr. Right soundtracks, 1991.
"Desperately Seeking Susan" remains a cultural milestone - it could never be replicated or duplicated. It was a massive hit at the box office and film critics alike. The movie was added to the Library of Congress' National Film Registry preservation list on December 13, 2023.
The first major studio film for the Material Girl helped the emerging singing star to become a worldwide music and fashion icon.
"Desperately Seeking Susan" movie still, 1985. Madonna as Susan.
The first major studio film for the Material Girl helped the emerging singing star to become a worldwide music and fashion icon.
a man standing next to a woman near a motorcycle
"Desperately Seeking Susan" movie still, 1985. L to R: Rosanna Arquette, Aidan Quinn.
The movie quickly picked up on the fashion sense of Madonna and the era, thereby capturing a moment in time that won't be seen again.
two women sitting next to each other talking
"Desperately Seeking Susan" movie still, 1985. L to R: Rosanna Arquette, Madonna.
PLOT: A bored New Jersey suburban housewife (Arquette) becomes fascinated with a free-spirited woman (Madonna) she has read about in the personal columns. This leads to her following her and then being mistaken for the woman herself.
two women standing next to each other in front of a book store with people looking at it
On the set of "Desperately Seeking Susan", 1985. L to R: Madonna, director Susan Seidelman.
The movie studio making this film wanted Barbara Streisand for the lead role while others were pushing for Diane Keaton and Goldie Hawn for the leads. Seidelman went with unknowns like John Turturro, Giancarlo Esposito, Laurie Metcalf and comedian Steven Wright all making their film debuts. Seidelman also made the decision to cast Rosanna Arquette and Madonna in the key roles.
a woman singing into a microphone with the words 20 feet from stardom
"20 Feet From Stardom" movie soundtrack, 2013.
This documentary was added to the Library of Congress' National Film Registry preservation list on December 13, 2023.
the movie poster for 20 feet from stardom features a woman talking on her cell phone
"20 Feet From Stardom" movie poster, 2013.
The film won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature at the 86th Academy Awards, 23 years after "In the Shadow of the Stars", a similar documentary that focused on the members of an opera chorus, won the same award in 1991.
a woman singing into a microphone in front of a microphone stand with lights on it
"20 Feet From Stardom" DVD screen capture, 2013. Darlene Love as herself.
Love began recording music with bands like The Crystals and soon was under the umbrella of producer Phil Spector. As a member of The Blossoms, she contributed backing vocals behind many of the biggest hits of the 1960s but never made it as a solo artist. She continued on as a backup singer throughout the 1970s and into the 1980s when her voice was finally recognized by the recording industry. Since then, she has had her own recording career and acted in several movies like "Lethal Weapon" (1987).
a woman standing in front of a microphone and singing into a microphone with her hands out
"20 Feet From Stardom" DVD screen capture, 2013. Merry Clayton as herself.
Clayton spent much of her career backing the singing of Pearl Bailey, Burt Bacharach, Tom Jones, and many others. One night in 1969, she was called to a recording session after 10 PM in Los Angeles. With her hair in curlers, she went in and found herself face to face with The Rolling Stones and famously recorded "Rape! Murder! It's just a shout away!" for the song "Gimme Shelter".
two children are sitting on the floor and one is reading a newspaper
"20 Feet From Stardom" DVD screen capture, 2013. L to R: Mick Jagger, Claudia Lennear.
PLOT: A documentary that focuses on the world of backup singers. They exist in a world that lies just beyond the spotlight. Their voices bring harmony to the biggest bands in popular music and the movie takes a look at the highs and lows of these remarkable singers. Lennear was with the Ike & Tina Turner Revue for many years before breaking out on her own. She worked with many acts including Humble Pie, Joe Cocker, Delaney & Bonnie, and George Harrison.
a movie poster for the film apolo 13, with an image of a man laying in bed
"Apollo 13" movie soundtrack, 1995.
The movie was a giant summer hit - earning $355 million and earning universal praise from film critics around the world. Moviegoers were astonished to find out that it was based on the actual NASA mission from 1970. "Apollo 13" was added to the Library of Congress' National Film Registry preservation list on December 13, 2023.
a man sitting in the cockpit of an airplane with headphones on and looking at something
"Apollo 13" movie still, 1995. Gary Sinise as NASA astronaut Ken Mattingly.
three men in space suits sitting next to each other
"Apollo 13" movie still, 1995. L to R: Bill Paxton, Kevin Bacon, Tom Hanks.
Both Brad Pitt and John Cusack were offered the roles played by Paxton and Bacon but refused in favor of other movies.
two men sitting at a desk in an office talking on the phone and another man standing next to them
"Apollo 13" movie still, 1995. L to R: Marc McClure, Ed Harris.
PLOT: After an explosion aboard the Apollo 13 spacecraft as it approached the moon, NASA must devise a strategy to return the damaged rocket and its crew back to Earth safely. McClure and Harris both play flight directors at NASA.
two men are posing for a photo in front of a machine
Kevin Bacon (left) and Tom Hanks (right) during training for "Apollo 13", 1995.
This movie was written with Kevin Costner in mind for the lead role of Capt. Jim Lovell. When Hanks asked about the screenplay, Costner was quickly forgotten and Tom was given the role after talking with producer/director Ron Howard. Howard had decided early in the production that no original NASA footage from the Apollo 13 mission would be used. This doubled the expanse of the production and full scale replicas of Mission Control were built and sets were designed to fit inside this aircraft where the actors would shoot in zero gravity for 45 seconds at a time.
a cartoon frog wearing a top hat and holding a cane in his hand with the caption, one frogy evening
"One Froggy Evening" Warner Brothers cartoon lobby card, 1955.
This short was voted No. 5 of The 50 Greatest Cartoons of all time by members of the animation field in 1994. Filmmaker Steven Spielberg called this cartoon "the 'Citizen Kane' of the animated world". In 2003, the United States Library of Congress deemed the film "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant", and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry.
a cartoon character is standing in front of a sign that says palace singing frog with an image of a man wearing a top hat
"One Froggy Evening" Warner Brothers cartoon still frame, 1955.
In 1995, director Chuck Jones created a new cartoon called "Another Froggy Evening". This short told the story of how the frog existed during the days of the caveman and ending with Marvin the Martian swooping him up to take into the next millennium or two.
a cartoon frog wearing a top hat and dancing
"One Froggy Evening" Warner Brothers cartoon still frame, 1955.
The cartoon was partly inspired by a 1944 Cary Grant film entitled "Once Upon a Time" that involved a dancing caterpillar in a small box. It also marked the debut of Michigan J. Frog to the Warner Bros. stable of cartoon characters. The singing voice was provided by bandleader Bill Roberts.
a brick wall with the words'one froggy evening'written in gold on it
"One Froggy Evening" Warner Brothers cartoon title card, 1955.
PLOT: A construction worker unearths a cornerstone and discovers a frog that sings and dances, but only when it is alone with the owner. We watch as the worker futilely struggles to make his fortune with the animal to no end. Directed by Chuck Jones.
black and white photograph of a man sitting in front of a book shelf with books on it
Animator Chuck Jones, circa early 1950s.
Jones began working for the animation department of Warner Bros. in the early 1930s and was an apprentice for the legendary Tex Avery - the creator of Looney Tunes, Bugs Bunny, etc.. By the 1950s, Jones was an Oscar winning cartoon director in his own right and began putting his own stamp on the world of animation.
a man standing next to a chair with a remote in his hand and the caption roger & me
"Roger & Me" laserdisc artwork, 1989.
In 2013, the documentary was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant".
a movie poster for roger and mol with an image of a man trying to get out
"Roger & Me" Belgian movie poster, 1989.
To pay for his documentary, writer/producer/director Michael Moore would mortgage his house, sold most of his belongings, and arranged a three-year series of weekly bingo games to raise the film's $200,000 budget. After its premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September, 1989, the documentary became involved in a bidding war with Disney and Warner Bros. to distribute the movie. Moore picked Warner Bros. for $3 million and allocated much of that money to help the citizens of Flint get back on their feet.
two men and a woman standing in front of a sign with a car on it
"Roger & Me" promo still, 1989.
Pictured: Rhoda Britton, writer/producer/director Michael Moore, Fred Ross. During the documentary, we meet a former auto worker (Britton) who is raising rabbits for pets or food to make ends meet and a deputy sheriff (Ross) whose main job is forcibly evicting out of work apartment tenants for non-payment of rent.
an old black and white photo of a man at a podium
"Roger & Me" promo still, 1989. Pictured: Roger Smith, CEO of General Motors.
black and white photograph of man with camera in hand, standing on street corner near building
"Roger & Me" promo still, 1989. Pictured: writer/producer/director Michael Moore.
The city of Flint, Michigan was a General Motors town - it was founded there in 1908 and quickly became the headquarters for both their Buick and Chevrolet divisions. By 1978, GM was employing nearly 80,000 people and the city was the second largest in Michigan. Then in the 1980s, GM began laying off thousands of workers worldwide and Flint took the brunt of it - by 2010, only 8,000 people remained on the GM payroll in the city. A former print journalist, Moore decided to cobble together a film crew to persuade then-CEO Roger Smith to come to Flint to see the widespread crime and urban flight thanks to GM's decisions.
an advertisement for blazing saddles featuring a man riding a horse with feathers on his head
"Blazing Saddles" movie soundtrack, 1974 / 2008 La-La Land Records re-release.
In 2006, "Blazing Saddles" was deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" by the Library of Congress and was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry.
a man and woman sitting at a dinner table
"Blazing Saddles" movie still, 1974. L to R: Madeline Kahn, Cleavon Little.
At her audition for this role, director Mel Brooks asked to see Kahn's legs. She was thrown for a loop but allowed Mel a look. Convinced that her legs looked like Marlene Dietrich's, Brooks cast her in the role of Lily von Schtupp where she famously sang "I'm Tired". She wound up winning a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination to boot!
two men standing next to each other in front of bookshelves and an american flag
"Blazing Saddles" movie still, 1974. L to R: Slim Pickens, Harvey Korman.
That's HEDLEY!
two men in costumes are standing on the street while others stand around and talk to each other
"Blazing Saddles" movie still, 1974. L to R: Gene Wilder, Cleavon Little.
PLOT: In order to ruin a western town to gain the land, a corrupt politician (Harvey Korman) appoints a black Sheriff (Little). With a drunk gunslinger (Wilder), the sheriff wins over the town and becomes the politician's most formidable adversary. Co-written/co-produced/directed by Mel Brooks.
black and white photograph of two men talking
On the set of "Blazing Saddles", 1974.
L to R: Co-writer/co-producer/director/co-star Mel Brooks, Cleavon Little. After winning the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for "The Producers", Brooks made the film "The Twelve Chairs" (1970) that bombed horrifically at the box office. His career as a director was in jeopardy when he was shown a screenplay called "Tex X", a comedy about a black sheriff in the Old West. Brooks refused, stating he only did projects that he wrote. When he was offered $150,000 on the spot, he said yes!
the goodfells album cover with three men in suits
"Goodfellas" movie soundtrack, 1990.
The movie is widely regarded as one of the greatest films ever made, particularly in the gangster genre. In 2000, it was deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the United States Library of Congress.
two men sitting at a table talking to each other
"Goodfellas" movie still, 1990. L to R: Ray Liotta, Bo Dietl.
Dietl was a legendary NYC detective who had served on the force from the 1960s to the 1980s. He retired and became an adviser for many TV shows and movies on the workings of the police, gangs, drugs, and the workings of the mob. He would collaborate with co-writer/director Martin Scorsese for this movie and "The Irishman" as well.
two people standing next to each other in front of a house
"Goodfellas" movie still, 1990. L to R: Ray Liotta, Lorraine Bracco.
a group of people sitting around a table eating food
"Goodfellas" movie still, 1990. Center to right: Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, Ray Liotta.
PLOT: The story of Henry Hill (Liotta) and his life in the Mafia, covering his relationship with his wife Karen (Lorraine Bracco) and his mob partners Jimmy Conway (De Niro) and Tommy DeVito (Pesci in an Oscar winning performance).
a man sitting in front of a camera
Co-writer/director Martin Scorsese on the set of "Wiseguy", 1989.
Based on the 1985 book of the same name by Nicholas Pileggi, Scorsese and Pileggi went through twelve screenplay drafts before going before the cameras. At the same time, Marty was meeting with Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, and Ray Liotta and allowing them to improvise their characters. Transcripts of these sessions were incorporated into the final screenplay.
a man standing next to a chair in front of a door with his leg on the floor
"The Graduate" movie soundtrack, 1967.
Director Mike Nichols approached Paul Simon to write songs for the soundtrack. Simon played a song he was working on about Eleanor Roosevelt which became "Mrs. Robinson", the signature song of the movie. Nichols also chose "April Come She Will", "Scarborough Fair", and "The Sounds of Silence" to use in the movie. In 1996, "The Graduate" was selected for preservation in the U.S. National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".
an old movie poster for the graduate
"The Graduate" movie poster, 1967.
Upon its release, the film was highly praised by film critics, the younger generation loved it, and the older generation hated it. Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert (then in his first year on the job) praised the film as "the funniest American comedy of the year". For the film's thirtieth anniversary reissue, Ebert retracted some of his previous praise for it, sympathizing more for Mrs. Robinson than for Benjamin and calling him "an insufferable creep".
the bride and groom are fighting with each other in front of a cross on the floor
"The Graduate" movie still, 1967. L to R: Katherine Ross, Dustin Hoffman.
Candice Bergen and Robert Redford were originally cast for these roles but director Mike Nichols chose Ross and Hoffman, despite the studio's misgivings.
a man and woman sitting at a table talking
"The Graduate" movie still, 1967. L to R: Anne Bancroft, Dustin Hoffman.
PLOT: A disillusioned college graduate (Hoffman) finds himself torn between his older lover (Bancroft) and her daughter (Katherine Ross).
a man laying on top of a bed with an open book next to him and two other men in the background
On the set of "The Graduate", 1967.
Background (L to R): Director Mike Nichols, author/co-screenwriter Calder Willingham, co-screenwriter/co-star Buck Henry. Lying in bed (L to R): Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancroft. Nichols held several weeks of rehearsal to block out the scenes and work the dialogue.
singin'in the rain movie poster with three men holding umbrellas and singing
"Singin' In The Rain" movie soundtrack, 1952 / 1996 Rhino Records re-release.
In 1989, "Singin' in the Rain" was one of the first 25 films selected by the United States Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".
a movie poster for singin'in the rain
"Singin' In The Rain" movie poster, 1952.
Made for $2.5 million in 1952 (equivalent to $29 million in 2023), the movie was a modest hit earning $7.2 million ($83 million).
a man jumping in the air on top of a lamp post
"Singin' In The Rain" movie still, 1952.
Star/co-choreographer/co-director Gene Kelly as Don Lockwood. When you watch this iconic musical number again, remind yourself that Kelly was sick with a 103 °F fever during the making of the scene.
three men sitting on top of a wooden bench in front of a table with chairs
"Singin' In The Rain" movie still, 1952.
L to R: Star/co-choreographer/co-director Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds, Donald O'Connor. PLOT: A silent film star (Kelly) falls for a chorus girl (Reynolds) just as he and his delusionally jealous screen partner (Jean Hagen) plus his best friend (O'Connor) are trying to make the difficult transition to talking pictures in 1920s Hollywood. Produced by Arthur Freed and featuring the songs of Freed and Nacio Herb Brown.